6 Boston rape suspects identified so far through genetic investigations

By | June 5, 2023

6 Boston rape suspects, including attorney Matthew Nilo, identified through genetic investigations

For 5 months, investigate Karen Anderson examined genetic genealogy and the potential it has for solving decades-old cold cases, including sexual assaults and murders. Across Massachusetts, district attorneys have begun using forensic technology to identify suspects they previously couldn’t. In Boston, police have used a grant to help pay for not only high-tech forensic testing but also old-fashioned detective work. The grant has led to six arrests so far, the most recent of which was Matthew Nilo, the man accused of raping multiple women from 2007 to 2008 in Charlestown. Last July, 5 Investigates Karen Anderson was invited to learn about the Boston Police Sexual Assault Kit Initiative. She used a $2.5 million federal grant to look into every unsolved rape in the city and to send 1,000 rape kits to an outside lab for advanced DNA testing. The grant was also paid to digitize files dating back to the 1980s and to hire a sexual assault crime analyst. In addition to Nile, police used this grant to identify and arrest Ivan Cheung, another alleged serial rapist arrested last fall who worked at State Street Bank as a vice president. Irving Pierre, William Mancortes, Ali Abdallah-Muhammad, and Demetrius Wilson were also arrested. In some of these cases, we know evidence was tested at the time of the crime and a DNA profile was created, but the police did not know whose it was. SAKI Resources paid for advanced testing, training and police work to find the person who matches the DNA. Boston Police say they believe there are about 200 serial rapists they want help identifying.

For 5 months, investigate Karen Anderson examined genetic genealogy and the potential it has for solving decades-old cold cases, including sexual assaults and murders. Across Massachusetts, district attorneys have begun using forensic technology to identify suspects they previously couldn’t.

In Boston, police have used a grant to help pay for not only high-tech forensic testing but also old-fashioned detective work. The grant has led to six arrests so far, the most recent of which was Matthew Nilo, the man accused of raping multiple women from 2007 to 2008 in Charlestown.

Last July, 5 Investigates Karen Anderson was invited to learn about the Boston Police Sexual Assault Kit initiative.

He used a $2.5 million federal grant to look into every unsolved rape in the city and to send 1,000 rape kits to an outside lab for advanced DNA testing. The grant also paid to digitize files dating back to the 1980s and to hire a sexual assault crime analyst.

“There are a number of unsolved rapes that we will solve, Boston Police Lieutenant Rich Driscoll promised 5 Investigates at the time.

In addition to Nilo, police used this grant to identify and arrest Ivan Cheung, another alleged serial rapist arrested last fall who worked at State Street Bank as a vice president.

Irving Pierre, William Mancortes, Ali Abdallah-Muhammad and Demetrius Wilson were also arrested.

In some of these cases, we know evidence was tested at the time of the crime and a DNA profile was created, but the police didn’t know who it was. SAKI assets paid for advanced testing, training and police work to find the person who matched the DNA.

Boston Police say they believe there are about 200 serial rapists they want to help identify.

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